BEFORE / AFTER

The evolution of brands through our branding exercise

BEFORE

AFTER

Seaco

Seaco’s old icon did not resonate with consumers and could not communicate what the brand was about. Hence, the logo was redesigned to look simple and modern with a fish symbol which conveyed Seaco’s identity as a seafood company.

BEFORE

AFTER

Seaco

Seaco’s old packaging was undifferentiated and lacked visual appeal. The redesigned packaging was more attractive and allowed consumers to visualise the final outcome that they were purchasing – a sumptuous seafood meal.

BEFORE

AFTER

Seaco

Seaco’s old packaging was undifferentiated and lacked visual appeal. The redesigned packaging was more attractive and allowed consumers to visualise the final outcome that they were purchasing – a sumptuous seafood meal.

BEFORE

AFTER

Bamco

Bamco’s old logo was unrepresentative of the company. The revamped logo utilises a colour scheme and stair image that allude to Bamco’s main product – eco-friendly Bamboo Charcoal flooring.

BEFORE

AFTER

Bamco

The new BamcoFlor packaging was designed according to the newly chosen brand colours – forest green and red. Green was chosen to associate BamcoFlor to environmental-friendliness and safety. The fixed brand colours also serve to create design consistency and boost Bamco’s brand image.

BEFORE

AFTER

Bamco

Similarly, BamcoFlor’s stationery was redesigned in line with the aforementioned elements. On top of that, 4 icons depicting the unique attributes of BamcoFlor were added into the design.

BEFORE

AFTER

GoldenBoy

GoldenBoy’s Savoury Corn old packaging did not make the product look appetising, especially in comparison to other snacks. After the packaging was redesigned, the product looked livelier and its unique taste is more clearly illustrated.

BEFORE

AFTER

TakeBerry

The old TakeBerry (used to be known as HanaBerry) packaging, while luxurious-looking, did not convey the essence of TakeBerry’s product as a health supplement. In the new design, salmon pink was used to represent renewed vitality in the consumption of TakeBerry’s drink, and product features were also clearly depicted with icons.

BEFORE

AFTER

Satomi

Satomi’s old packaging brought out the product’s indigenous heritage, but just like every other rice brand, their traditional appeal was irreconcilable with the present-day aesthetic. To stand out from competitors, the new design was made to look contemporary and stylish while retaining the traditional elements of mountains and paddy fields.

BEFORE

AFTER

Pasture

Pasture’s original logo did not embody the nurturing spirit behind Pasture’s pharmaceutical business. After the makeover, their logo looked colourful but with a gentle touch, which gives Pasture an amiable and benevolent brand appearance. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Pasture

Previously, Pasture’s junior and senior masks had standard run-of-the-mill designs, they lacked concept and vibrancy. The redesigned packaging brought in the idea of how Pasture masks can help vulnerable children and elderly evolve into superheroes, which creates emphasis on the power of Pasture masks. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Pasture

The packaging of regular Pasture Pharma masks was given a new Asian face to relate to Asian audiences and achieve brand localisation. The colours and design layout also made the new packaging appear more dynamic and attractive. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Hup Huat

Before the transformation, Hup Huat’s packaging and logo designs were inconsistent – the colours were garish and this reduced the product’s credibility. After the transformation, all the product ranges consistently donned a distinctive new look that still retained Hup Huat’s Chinese heritage with rice coloured packaging and Chinese words. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Hup Huat

Originally, Hup Huat had more than 200 SKUs with inconsistent packaging which dilutes the brand’s visibility and credibility. After the transformation, all the product ranges consistently donned a distinctive new look that still retained Hup Huat’s Chinese heritage with rice coloured packaging and Chinese words. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Qavar

Before the transformation, QAVAR’s logo did not exude the essence of their business. During the transformation, the Q of “QAVAR” was adapted into a search icon, while “A” and “V” were creatively modified to look like arrows, and the tagline “get sorted” was added below the name of the company to accentuate the nature of QAVAR’s business. QAVAR’s symbolic colours were also given greater emphasis when adapted into the new logo. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Haleywood

Haleywood’s old logo was completely unrepresentative of the company’s business, the symbol was too vague to aid in brand recognition and recall. After the overhaul, the new logo comprised of Haleywood’s name, and donned a sleek look which suits the essence of Haleywood’s business – a modern furniture provider. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Financial Alliance

Initially, Financial Alliance (FA)’s logo was too generic and did not communicate anything about the company. In the new version, the logo was no longer confined in a square and there was an added component of an upward arrow. This made the logo look more lively and dynamic, highlighting FA’s position as a leading company in the industry. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

DEG

DEG’s original logo did not express the modernity and dynamicity of DEG’s service and philosophy. The new logo utilised an element of a plant/windmill to exhibit the company’s eco-friendliness and energy efficiency with an added tagline “where engineering gets better” to clarify the company’s identity. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

HarriAnns

HarriAnn’s old name card could not portray the brand’s business nature and distinctive identity. In the new name card design, there were colourful depictions of Nonya delicacies designed by hand, and this gave the name cards a personal touch which alluded to the uniqueness of handmade Nonya delights. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

HarriAnns

When HarriAnns expanded its business unit to delve to become Halal ready for one of its new outlets, it needed a distinctive branding away from the original HarriAnns logo. Therefore, a new logo design is created to differentiate the new business from HarriAnns yet retaining familiar elements. Refer to Case Study

BEFORE

AFTER

Total

Originally, Total Lubricants’ product packaging did not have any specific visual elements and it contained technical terms which may confuse average consumers. The new design incorporated an image of a motorcyclist that work with layman terms to help consumers understand the product. The newly designed product also looked livelier and more exciting. Refer to Case Study

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